How to Support Your Thyroid Gland

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Posted by Dr Janine Bowring

December 21, 2020

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One of the most common problems I see in my patients, particularly my female patients, is hypothyroidism or a low-functioning thyroid. Your thyroid gland is located in the front of your neck and sometimes you can have what I call Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). This is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within normal range but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels are only mildly elevated.

How to Support Your Thyroid Gland

One of the most common problems I see in my patients, particularly my female patients, is hypothyroidism or a low-functioning thyroid. Your thyroid gland is located in the front of your neck and sometimes you can have what I call Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). This is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within normal range but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels are only mildly elevated. Some of the symptoms of a low-functioning thyroid are: always feeling cold, a slower metabolism, your hair may be falling out, headaches, lack of energy, very dry skin, constipation, your face may look puffy, your cholesterol levels may seem elevated, and if this continues for while without treatment, you may start feeling low and depressed. So what can you do about this naturally?1) Fix your leptin resistance. Check out my other blogs and videos on leptin resistance. 2) Detoxification: all the toxins we are exposed to on a daily basis filter through the thyroid gland. I recommend doing a detoxification protocol at least four times a year, at the change of the seasons. A lot of the heavy metals that we’e exposed to (i.e. mercury, aluminum, etc.) actually sit in the thyroid and can have a negative effect. What many people don’t realize is that the liver is related to the thyroid hormones and how they’re balanced. 3) Check your basal body temperature: first thing in the morning, before getting out of bed. Keep the thermometer next to your bed and take the temperature before moving or getting up. Normal body temperature should be 36.4 deg C or 98.6 deg F. Anything below that is the equivalent of having a low-functioning thyroid. It’s important to track the temperature for 3-4 weeks and if it’s consistently low, you know there may be something wrong with your thyroid function. 4) Hot and Cold Hydrotherapy: to give the thyroid a boost. The easiest way to do this is to have two bowls of water, one hot and one cold, along with two facecloths. Start with the hot one and place the hot facecloth on the thyroid for about two minutes. Then change to the cold and leave it on for as long as you can stand it. What this does is gets the blood flowing through the thyroid gland and increases its function. Go back and forth three times, always starting with the hot and ending with the cold. This will get your thyroid functioning. 

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Uncategorized How to Support Your Thyroid Gland